FACT SHEET: Advancing Shared Values for A Better World

U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with Pope Francis (R) during their meeting at the Vatican March 27, 2014. Obama's first meeting on Thursday with Pope Francis was expected to focus on the fight against poverty and skirt moral controversies over abortion and gay rights. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (VATICAN - Tags: POLITICS RELIGION)

U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with Pope Francis. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

Today the President hosted His Holiness Pope Francis at the White House and thanked him for the ways in which he is inspiring people around the world to embrace justice, mercy, and compassion, particularly toward those who have been marginalized.  The President and Pope Francis discussed their shared values and commitments on a wide range of issues, including our moral responsibility to provide refuge for people who are forced to flee from their homelands; the belief that we have an obligation to seize the historic opportunity to end extreme poverty within a generation; the conviction that all members of the human family have equal value and infinite worth and should have the opportunity to realize safe and productive futures for themselves; the belief that reconciliation can happen not only between people but also between nations; the conviction that we must secure the unalienable right of all people to practice their faith according to the dictates of conscience, standing against those who would target people for violence, persecution, or discrimination based on their religion; and the duty to manage the resources of the earth today in such a way that will allow our children and grandchildren to live their lives abundantly tomorrow.

To mark this historic meeting and advance these shared values and objectives, the President is pursuing the following initiatives:

San Diego Police’s Body Camera Program Can Reduce Officer Force

San Diego Police Liuetenant Dawn Summers shows off two different body cameras that are currently being tested by the department.

San Diego Police Liuetenant Dawn Summers shows off two different body cameras that are currently being tested by the department.

By City News Service

A preliminary review of the San Diego Police Department‘s year-old “body camera” program suggests that the uniform-mounted devices can help reduce officers’ use of force in the field and simultaneously lessen citizens’ accusations of misconduct against them, SDPD Chief Shelley Zimmerman said Wednesday.

This one chart shows you the politics of U.S. citizenship

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By Tom K. Wong

Donald Trump has reignited the immigration debate in the United States. One of his main immigration reform proposals is to end birthright citizenship, that is, to deny citizenship to children born in the U.S. to undocumented parents. He struck a nerve. Birthright citizenship divides Americans along clear partisan, ideological, and demographic lines. But while this is one of the more radical elements of Trump’s broader immigration reform proposals, the issue of birthright citizenship is not new.

In the House, resolutions and bills have been introduced on the issue in every Congress since 1993: House Resolution 129 (1993-1994), House Resolution 93 (1995-1996), the Citizenship Reform Act (1997-2000), H.R. 190 (2001-2002), the Citizenship Reform Act again (2003-2006), and now theBirthright Citizenship Act (2007-present).

Op-Ed: Obama Administration Must Take Action Against Rampant Racial Profiling, Rights Violations Near U.S. Borders


Op-Ed by Christian Ramirez and Diego Iniguez-Lopez

As immigration issues grab headlines across the nation, congressional leaders on both sides of the aisle resort to knee jerk reactions calling for wasteful, military-style tactics along the southern border, reflecting the deep misunderstanding that Capitol Hill has of border communities.

These efforts fail to address glaring systemic problems within the nation’s largest law enforcement agency, Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and fail to offer solutions that will move us forward together.

Deported Migrants Are Stripped of Their Dignity. They Shouldn’t Also Be Stripped of Their Belongings.


By Astrid Reyes, ACLU Human Rights Program

Sisters Imelda and Sandy traveled to the U.S. to reunite with their families in New Jersey when Border Patrol apprehended them near Columbus, N.M. According to Programa de Defensa e Incidencia Binacional, a Mexican human rights coalition, the sisters were natives of a rural town in Tlaxcala, a southcentral state in Mexico. It took all of their strength, courage, and savings to come to the U.S. to provide for their families and send their children to decent schools. After being detained for four months, they then found themselves repatriated to Ciudad Juárez, an enormous and perilous border town completely foreign to them. The U.S. government took what little they had left and deported them without their money, identification cards, cell phones, photos, and other mementos. Imelda did not even get her wedding ring back. Through tears they explained they could not remember their mother’s phone number to call for money so they could go home. After immense sacrifices to secure a better future for their families, Imelda and Sandy had been left empty-handed.