ThinkProgress: The Most Heartbreaking Place In America Is Called ‘Friendship Park’

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014

This is the first in a series of pieces from ThinkProgress chronicling the struggles of immigrant...

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President Obama to Offer Administrative Relief

Posted by on Nov 19, 2014

WHAT IS ADMINISTRATIVE RELIEF? On Thursday, November 20th, President Obama is anticipated to...

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‘You Are America’ | Quien es Elegible

Posted by on Oct 23, 2014

Usted puede ser elegible para la ciudadanía si cumple con TODOS los siguientes criterios:  ...

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Renovacion de DACA para DREAMers

Posted by on Oct 16, 2014

El Dreamer Assistance Network continua promoviendo DACA con asistencia gratuita para aplicar. Los...

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Recent News

On 20th anniversary of Operation Gatekeeper, San Diego coalition speaks out against its failed enforcement legacy

PRESS RELEASE
October/1/2014

For Immediate Release
Contact: Ricardo Favela, (760) 659-3620, ricardo@alliancesd.org

San Diego, CA: On October 1, 1994, the federal government implemented Operation Gatekeeper along the California border with Mexico, as part of a larger border enforcement strategy. Gatekeeper had the intention of pushing the migrant flow away from urban areas and into less visible, but inhospitable and harsh terrain.

Today, on its 20th anniversary, the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium, a coalition of more than twenty San Diego-based organizations working to support immigrant rights in the County, calls on the federal government to shift away from failed enforcement strategies that exacerbate border deaths and instead prioritize its resources for life-saving measures that will prevent the loss of life along the borderlands.

Migrants attempting to enter the United States continue to make treacherous journeys crossing through mountainous and desert landscapes, where they succumb to extreme temperatures in great numbers.

Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

New York Post: How immigration can save Medicare

Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

 

Like 50 million other Medicare recipients, I will receive the care I need more or less free of charge thanks to Medicare.
It’s something most seniors take for granted — a benefit we believe we’re entitled to because, after all, we paid Medicare taxes all our working lives.

But as it happens, those taxes aren’t nearly enough to pay for the benefits we receive from the system — at least for most of us.

Despite the fact that I still work and pay hefty Medicare taxes, I am likely to become one of those people who becomes a drain on the system if I live long enough (my mother died at 90, my grandmother at 95).

Medicare is fast becoming unsustainable, especially as baby boomers like me enter the system.

We may be living longer and healthier lives, but it’s costing taxpayers more than we can afford unless something changes.

Debate in Washington has centered on fixes that are likely to be painful: lower benefits and restrict procedures; raise the age of eligibility; or substantially increase taxes to pay for the system.

But a new idea emerged this week from a study that shows that one demographic group in our population actually takes less out than they contribute: immigrants.

Allow more people to immigrate here, and we keep Medicare solvent longer.

Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

Amid border crisis debate, many new immigrants land in D.C. area

By Richard Simon

Virginia is more than 1,500 miles from the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas, epicenter of the border crisis.

And it is the home state of Rep. Eric Cantor, who was defeated by a tea party novice who attacked the former House majority leader for being open to “amnesty” for at least some immigrants in the country illegally.

But Yesenia, 16, and her brother, Herson, 12, are here.

Junior, 14, is in Virginia too. So is Claudia, 13.

Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.