SDIRC Interviews Said Abiyow at the 21th Annual Immigrant Day in Sacramento

El pueblo unido, Jamas será vencido! Ang tao ang bayan, ngayon ay lumalaban! The people united, will never be defeated!

May 15th, 2017 was the 21st Annual Immigrant Day. The SDIRC delegation of 33 San Diego leaders successfully met with all 11 assembly members and senators who represent a piece or region of San Diego County.

The day was kicked off with a rally and program of speakers to ground all participating organizations and individuals for the day ahead. There was a variety of speakers from all over the state who stood in front of the hundreds to speak their truth. The speakers ranged from faith leaders, community leaders and organizational representatives who shared stories, either their own or of the communities they work with. They spoke about the importance of building and maintaining a united front on the issues that affect all of us, especially considering the targeted threats under the Trump administration.

During our time at the state’s capitol, we had the opportunity to get to know, learn from and interview Said Abiyow, current President and CEO of the Somali Bantu Association of America, now a member organization of SDIRC. Below are his responses and impressions as a first time participant in Immigrant Day.

Immigrant Day: Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future

By Erin Tsurumoto Grassi

As the granddaughter of Japanese Americans who were imprisoned during World War II, the importance of Immigrant Day could not be clearer. After all, this is a chance for advocates like myself and others across the state to join efforts and advocate for immigrant rights in Sacramento.

The 21st Annual Immigrant Day will take place on Monday, May 15, and the  San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium is proud to be sending a record-size delegation to our state’s capital. Close to 40 leaders from across San Diego County will join hundreds of other community members and activists who will meet with elected representatives from every quarter of the county.

Record-Size Delegation Travels to Sacramento for Immigrant Day

Dozens of community members and advocates from San Diego will meet with the county’s state elected officials

SAN DIEGO, CA –The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC) is proud to send a record-size delegation to our state’s capital on Monday, May 15, for the 21st Annual Immigrant Day, a day of action that brings together advocates from across the state to fight for immigrant rights.

Close to 40 leaders from across San Diego County will join hundreds of other community members and activists. They will meet with elected representatives from every quarter of the county to advocate for policies that protect immigrant communities from a Federal administration that seeks to criminalize, deport and separate families.

Union-Tribune: Denouncing the wall

Local activists hold a press conference denouncing Donald Trump’s exectuvie orders targeting immigrants and refugees as well as the proposed building of a wall along the entire border between the United States and Mexico.

Read more at the Union-Tribune for the full story.

TAKE ACTION: Support SB54, “California Values Act”

Californians, we have to do everything in our power to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the communities most threatened by this administration’s racist, xenophobic agenda. The California State Senate introduced SB 54, the California Values Act which would provide protection for undocumented immigrants and ban the use of state and local resources for mass deportations.

TAKE ACTION: Tell California state lawmakers and Governor Brown to expedite the California Values Act now.

San Diego Immigrant and Refugee Leaders Condemn President Trump’s Actions

San Diego Immigrant and Refugee Leaders Condemn President Trump’s Actions

 

SAN DIEGO — Leaders from across San Diego County strongly condemn President Trump’s executive orders to shut out immigrants and refugees with policies and walls that divide us rather than bring us together.

As a result of the president’s actions, refugees, who are mostly women and children fleeing war and violence and who have already been vetted, now stand in harm’s way. Immigrants and visa applicants from entire countries are now blocked based on nothing more than the geography of their birth, harkening back to discriminatory immigration policies of the past. In addition, southern border communities that lack resources and infrastructure are now facing the prospects of an expanded border wall that does nothing to revitalize their communities.