California legislators challenge Trump anti-immigrant agenda

OAKLAND, Calif. – As their new two-year legislative session opened Dec. 5, members of California’s state Senate and Assembly moved quickly to build on post-election initiatives to protect and uphold the rights of the state’s undocumented immigrants.

A 2015 study by the Public Policy Institute of California estimated California’s undocumented population at 2.67 million, or nearly a quarter of undocumented immigrants in the U.S., and said they make up just over 6 percent of the state’s population. Other estimates put the figure at around 2.3 million.

Dick Durbin, Lindsey Graham Unveil Bill To Stop Donald Trump From Ending Protections For Dreamers

WASHINGTON ― Sens. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) unveiled legislation on Friday to protect young undocumented immigrants from deportation under President-elect Donald Trump ― now the question is whether it will work.

The bill, called the Bridge Act, would effectively maintain the protections of President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACAMore than 740,000 young people were granted deportation reprieve and work permits under the program, but could now lose those protections, should Trump follow through on a promise to end DACA immediately upon taking office.

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SDIRC Applauds California Bills That Supports Immigrants and Refugees

The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC) has issued the following statement regarding legislation in California that would protect immigrants and refugees against potentially harsh immigration policies from the Federal Government:
 
When it comes to standing up for immigrants and refugees, the time for rhetoric is over, and the time to take action is now. That’s why we applaud state elected officials in California for taking proactive measures to protect immigrants and refugees against potentially harsh immigration and enforcement policies from the incoming Trump Administration. 

Trust between the community and local law enforcement is essential for everyone’s security. Policies that require local law enforcement to help enforce federal immigration law erode this trust and put everyone’s safety at risk. Schools, clinics, hospitals, places of worship and other sensitive locations should be deemed off-limits to immigration enforcement agents. It’s important that immigrants and refugees have access to proper legal representation when needed.


The best way to protect the wellbeing of our entire community is ensuring that people feel they can move freely in their communities without fear.” 

About San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium
The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium is a project of Alliance San Diego. Beginning in 2007, community, faith, labor, and legal organizations have come together as the Immigrant Rights Consortium. Through the Consortium, these organizations are pursuing four common goals: Support comprehensive immigration reform; top the spread of local policies and practices that target and violate the civil and human rights of immigrants; educate immigrants about their rights and the legal and other resources available to them and educate the public about the important contributions of immigrants and counter the myths and misstatements made about immigrants. For more information about the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium, please visit www.immigrantsandiego.org.
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California’s university leaders are urging Trump to embrace students who are in the U.S. illegally

Leaders of California’s three systems of public higher education sent a joint letter to President-elect Donald Trump on Tuesday urging him to allow students who are in the country illegally to continue their educations without fear of deportation.

“These sons and daughters of undocumented immigrants are as American as any other child across the nation” in all but the letter of the law, do not pose a safety threat and have contributed to their communities, wrote University of California President Janet Napolitano, Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White and Eloy Ortiz Oakley, chancellor-designate of California Community Colleges.

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Haitian Men Cut Off From Families as U.S. Tightens Entry Rules

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MEXICO CITY — A sudden shift in American immigration policy has divided scores of Haitian families trying to enter the United States from Mexico, immigrants and advocates say.

The policy change, announced last week, has separated wives from husbands and children from their fathers, stranding the men in Mexico after their families were allowed to cross into the United States.

“I’m hoping God makes miracles,” said Sandra Alexandre, who was allowed into the United States last week ahead of her boyfriend and gave birth three days later. The new policy went into effect right before the child’s father could cross.

The family separations appear to be an unintended consequence of the Obama administration’s effort to tighten the border against the arrival of thousands of Haitians streaming north from Brazil, mostly to seek employment in the United States.

Read the full story here.

 

KUSI: U.S. closes door to Haitian earthquake survivors

SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The United States is closing the doors on thousands of Haitian immigrants who want to come to the U.S.

On Thursday, the Department of Homeland Security announced a policy change that prevents more survivors of the Haiti earthquake from entering the U.S. through the San Ysidro Border.

It’s important to know what these people are not. They are not illegal. They are not refugees. They are not asylum seekers.

They are seeking humanitarian help.