SDIRC Applauds California Bills That Supports Immigrants and Refugees

The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC) has issued the following statement regarding legislation in California that would protect immigrants and refugees against potentially harsh immigration policies from the Federal Government:
 
When it comes to standing up for immigrants and refugees, the time for rhetoric is over, and the time to take action is now. That’s why we applaud state elected officials in California for taking proactive measures to protect immigrants and refugees against potentially harsh immigration and enforcement policies from the incoming Trump Administration. 

Trust between the community and local law enforcement is essential for everyone’s security. Policies that require local law enforcement to help enforce federal immigration law erode this trust and put everyone’s safety at risk. Schools, clinics, hospitals, places of worship and other sensitive locations should be deemed off-limits to immigration enforcement agents. It’s important that immigrants and refugees have access to proper legal representation when needed.


The best way to protect the wellbeing of our entire community is ensuring that people feel they can move freely in their communities without fear.” 

About San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium
The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium is a project of Alliance San Diego. Beginning in 2007, community, faith, labor, and legal organizations have come together as the Immigrant Rights Consortium. Through the Consortium, these organizations are pursuing four common goals: Support comprehensive immigration reform; top the spread of local policies and practices that target and violate the civil and human rights of immigrants; educate immigrants about their rights and the legal and other resources available to them and educate the public about the important contributions of immigrants and counter the myths and misstatements made about immigrants. For more information about the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium, please visit www.immigrantsandiego.org.
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Immigrant and Refugee Groups To Host Presidential Debate Watch Party

Informal discussion with community members to follow afterward

SAN DIEGO, CA  –  With immigration and refugees as one of the main topics of the third and final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, immigrant rights and refugee groups in San Diego will gather to watch the debate and encourage the community to vote on Tuesday, November 8.
The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC) along with theSan Diego office of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the Islamic Center of San Diego (ICSD), and MAS-PACE (Muslim American Society) will host a debate watch party on Wednesday, October 19.
Media will have an opportunity to speak with members of immigrant and refugee communities to get their reaction to the presidential debate. There will be interviews opportunities in Spanish.
WHAT: Presidential Debate Viewing Party with immigrant and refugees groups
WHEN: Wednesday, October 19, 6 p.m.
About San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium
The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium is a project of Alliance San Diego. Beginning in 2007, community, faith, labor, and legal organizations have come together as the Immigrant Rights Consortium. Through the Consortium, these organizations are pursuing four common goals: Support comprehensive immigration reform; top the spread of local policies and practices that target and violate the civil and human rights of immigrants; educate immigrants about their rights and the legal and other resources available to them and educate the public about the important contributions of immigrants and counter the myths and misstatements made about immigrants. For more information about the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium, please visit www.immigrantsandiego.org.
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New Report Pushes Back Against Erasure of Black Immigrants Facing State Violence

By Tina Vasquez

The Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI) and New York University Law School’s Immigrant Rights Clinic have released a groundbreaking two-part report shedding light on an often overlooked community: the nation’s 3.7 million Black immigrants.

Historically, immigration hasn’t been considered from a race perspective, said Carl Lipscombe, BAJI’s policy and legal manager and co-author of the report, in a phone interview with Rewire. Lipscombe explained that immigrants’ rights organizations and policymakers often see it as a “Latino issue,” leading to the erasure of Black immigrants. This might be because Latino migrants represent a significant portion of the immigrant population in the United States. For example, Mexican immigrants account for approximately 28 percent of the 42.4 million foreign-born in the United States, making them the largest immigrant group in the country, according to the Migration Policy Institute. But as advocates, including Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza, have noted, “there are half a million black folks living within the United States in the shadows” and subject to deportation.

Read the full story here.

Black Lives Matter joins the fight against the unjust immigration system

Black_Lives_Matter_protest_march_(23051729395)

The Black Lives Matter movement this week announced it has adopted a 10-point platform that includes a call to end all deportations. It could be a game changer.

Black Lives Matter, which started as a hashtag in 2013, has quickly evolved into a leading civil rights movement that until this week has mainly focused on policing issues that affect the black community. But on Monday the movement adopted a more comprehensive platform developed by the Movement for Black Lives, which has a list of demands, including a call for an “end to the war on Black immigrants.”

ACLU Report Documents Struggle Of Deported Veterans

CR: ACLU

CR: ACLU

Enrique Salas, who served four years in the Marines and was eligible for citizenship, was deported to Mexico about a decade ago.

His mistake? After his brother was killed in a military training accident, Salas began to use drugs. He served a six-month sentence for possession of a controlled substance. In 2006, his criminal record led to his deportation.

POLITICO: Immigration reformers eye Gang of 8 revival

CHARLES DHARAPAK / AP

CHARLES DHARAPAK / AP

By SEUNG MIN KIM and BURGESS EVERETT

Lindsey Graham doesn’t sugarcoat his prediction: Republicans are going to get thrashed in the November election, especially among Latinos. And it’s going to trigger another run at immigration reform in Congress next year, the South Carolina senator says.