SDIRC Denounces Cruel Decision to End TPS for El Salvador

SAN DIEGO, CA — The Trump administration announced today that it will end the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for 200,000 Salvadorans who have been living, working and raising their families in the United States for 17 years. Their status will effectively end in 18 months.

El Salvador cannot handle the return of hundreds of thousands of its citizens given the country’s violence, corruption, narcotics trafficking and the inability of its weak government institutions to accommodate a massive influx of people. Fortunately, Congress can fix this: multiple bills with bipartisan support have been introduced to create a permanent solution for Salvadorans and other TPS holders. Congress should get to work on this immediately.

Laura Moreno, Chair of the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium, issued the following statement:

“This cruel decision will upend the lives of hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans and their U.S. born children at a time when El Salvador continues to be plagued by violence and corruption and is in no condition to receive them. These are hardworking individuals who pay taxes and contribute to our communities and economy. Many are helping in the recovery efforts in Florida and Houston following the hurricanes. They are parents to nearly 275,000 U.S. citizen children and there is no plan to address the break up of these families. San Diego is a thriving and diverse city thanks in part to the contributions of immigrants and refugees who call this place home. We must continue to support these families, and Congress must now act for a permanent solution.”

About the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium

The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium is a project of Alliance San Diego. Since 2007, community, faith, labor, and legal organizations have come together as the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC). Through SDIRC, these organizations are pursuing four common goals: support comprehensive immigration reform; stop the spread of local policies and practices that target and violate the civil and human rights of immigrants; educate immigrants, and educate the public about the important contributions of immigrants. More at www.immigrantsandiego.org.

 

California Takes Bold Step To Protect Immigrant Families

Governor Brown signed the “California Values Act” into law, limiting cooperation between local and state agencies and immigration agents

 

SAN DIEGO, CA — Today, Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 54 the “California Values Act” into law. The landmark law, which takes effect in January, will protect immigrants across the state by limiting local law enforcement collaboration with immigration agents.

Pedro Rios, Director of the American Friends Service Committee’s U.S./Mexico Border Program, and a member of the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium, released the following statement:

“We applaud the Governor for signing the “California Values Act” into law. As a border community, where we have more immigration officials than local law enforcement, this bill is critical to protecting our community members. The “California Values Act” reaffirms our state’s commitment to valuing and protecting all of its residents, no matter where they come from, and sends a powerful message of inclusion across the nation.

We also recognize that California must do much more to embrace the humanity of all who call our state home, including Californians criminalized by racially biased systems of mass incarceration. We will keep fighting to raise the bar for due process and equal treatment statewide.”

About San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium
The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium is a project of Alliance San Diego. Since 2007, community, faith, labor, and legal organizations have come together as the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC). Through SDIRC, these organizations are pursuing four common goals: support comprehensive immigration reform; stop the spread of local policies and practices that target and violate the civil and human rights of immigrants; educate immigrants, and educate the public about the important contributions of immigrants. More at: www.immigrantsandiego.org.

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State-by-State Estimates of the Family Members of Unauthorized Immigrants

By Silva Mathema

A new analysis from the University of Southern California’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration and the Center for American Progress estimates that millions of people, including American citizens, live in mixed-status families with unauthorized immigrants. Given this make-up, large swaths of people will suffer from any actions that target unauthorized immigrants.

Nationally, more than 16.7 million people have at least one unauthorized family member living with them, among whom nearly 50 percent, or 8.2 million, are U.S.-born or naturalized citizens. In fact, there are 5.9 million citizen children who will potentially be at risk if their unauthorized family members are targeted.

Read the full story here.

Trio of Lawmakers Plan ‘California Welcomes Refugees’ Bill

By Chris Jennewein

Assembly members from San Diego, Los Angeles and Sacramento plan to introduce legislation Wednesday that will welcome refugees to the Golden State.

Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher from San Diego, Adrin Nazarian from Sherman Oaks in the San Fernando Valley and Kevin McCarty from Sacramento have scheduled a news conference for 11:30 a.m. to introduce the legislation.

Read the full story here.

How Trump’s attorney general pick could shape immigration policy

By Rob Garvey

President-elect Donald Trump ran for election on a platform built in large part on enforcing laws—however harsh—against illegal immigrants and a promise to bar refugees and others from Muslim countries from entering the United States.

Now, experts say, with his decision to nominate Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to be Attorney General, Trump is giving one of the most ardent anti-illegal immigration voices in the US Congress tremendous power to reshape immigration enforcement in the United States.

Sessions, the first member of the Senate to endorse Trump’s candidacy, strenuously opposed bipartisan immigration reform bills that came before the Senate in 2007 and 2013, arguing that they were insufficiently strict and ultimately led to amnesty.

Read the full story here.

A lot depends on Trump’s definition of ‘criminal’ and ‘immigrant’

By Kate Morrissey

As President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration approaches, his hard-line supporters and the unauthorized immigrants he has pledged to oust are waiting to find out how Trump will define a group that he has often railed against — “criminal immigrants.”

Both words of that phrase raise questions about Trump’s main targets for immigration policy.

“Criminal” raises questions because while a person’s immigration status is considered a civil matter, anyone who crosses the border without permission could be charged with a misdemeanor, illegal entry. Anyone who does it twice could be charged with a felony, illegal re-entry. Some wonder whether Trump will increase prosecution of these offenses as part of his plan to deport criminals.

“Immigrant” raises questions because, while Trump’s supporters seem focused on unauthorized immigrants, those who are here legally — such as with a green card — can also commit crimes and be deported for it.

Read the full story here.