Letter to Congress: We Want Dreamer Protection


Today, the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium along with more than 250 national, state and local organizations sent a letter urging congressional leaders to enact permanent protections for Dreamers and reject the White House’s nativist wish list. The letter, signed by civil rights, labor rights, faith-based, immigrant, human rights, education, and health organizations makes it clear that “protecting Dreamers cannot come at the cost of harming other immigrants or immigrant communities, nor can it entail militarizing the border, keeping families apart or undermining life-saving humanitarian protections.”

Since President Trump rescinded the DACA program, more than 19,000 Dreamers have lost protection. The American people overwhelmingly support a path to citizenship, not a kick-the-can-down-the-road temporary solution. We hope this letter along with our combined advocacy efforts this week will ensure that we win permanent protections for Dreamers and block efforts to use them as hostages to advance anti-immigrant policies.

Read the full letter here.

San Diegans Oppose Cruel and Heartless Decision to End DACA

San Diegans Oppose Cruel and Heartless Decision to End DACA

 
Up to 40,000 San Diegans who were brought to the United States as children could end up  deported to places they barely know


SAN DIEGO, CA — In a cruel and heartless decision, the Trump administration has decided to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program while giving Congress a six-month delay to come up with a legislative solution.
This decision will negatively impact nearly 800,000 young people, including as many as 40,000 in San Diego, who under this program have been able to work, study, and contribute to America.

California DREAMing: Two Young Latinas Graduating as DACA Students Question Their Future by NIRMA HASTY

By Nirma Hasty

SAN DIEGO, Calif. — Lizbeth Contreras, a high school senior and Itzel Guillen, a college senior, have mapped out their career and education futures.

Nonetheless, their graduations are filled with uncertainty even though they have temporary reprieves from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA program. Lizbeth, 17, crossed the border from Mexico to San Diego with her mom at the age of 3. Itzel, 22, arrived in the U.S. when she was 4.

“Being Mexican, you wait for your (15th birthday) because of your quinceañera. But I was waiting to become 15 because I knew that then, I could finally apply to DACA,” said Lizbeth.

Since former President Barack Obama authorized DACA in 2012, some 800,000 teens and young adults, many who have grown up in the U.S., have been able to remain in the country, work and go to college. In some states, the program has also allowed them to qualify for scholarships or get driver’s licenses.

Read the full story here.

Sanctuary cities: Model leadership to ensure safety of most vulnerable

By Pedro Rios

Cities and counties around the country are taking the audacious step of declaring their municipal governments sanctuaries to demonstrate solidarity with immigrants and refugees who reside within their jurisdictions. The bold declarations are necessary and responsible actions that respond to the uncertainty of increased threats by President Donald Trump about targeting immigrants and refugees for mass deportation. But really, sanctuary cities are an extension of the obligation that elected officials have of ensuring the safety and well-being of their constituents.

San Diego Unified to Trump: Spare Our Undocumented Students

A resolution reaffirming the values of peace, tolerance and respect for multiple perspectives was adopted unanimously Tuesday night by the San Diego Unified School Board less than a month after Donald Trump was elected president.

The resolution was sparked by fears felt by some district students that Trump’s election would lead to the deportation of some students, their families and friends, who may be in the U.S. illegally, according to district officials.

California legislators challenge Trump anti-immigrant agenda

OAKLAND, Calif. – As their new two-year legislative session opened Dec. 5, members of California’s state Senate and Assembly moved quickly to build on post-election initiatives to protect and uphold the rights of the state’s undocumented immigrants.

A 2015 study by the Public Policy Institute of California estimated California’s undocumented population at 2.67 million, or nearly a quarter of undocumented immigrants in the U.S., and said they make up just over 6 percent of the state’s population. Other estimates put the figure at around 2.3 million.