SDIRC Interviews Said Abiyow at the 21th Annual Immigrant Day in Sacramento

El pueblo unido, Jamas será vencido! Ang tao ang bayan, ngayon ay lumalaban! The people united, will never be defeated!

May 15th, 2017 was the 21st Annual Immigrant Day. The SDIRC delegation of 33 San Diego leaders successfully met with all 11 assembly members and senators who represent a piece or region of San Diego County.

The day was kicked off with a rally and program of speakers to ground all participating organizations and individuals for the day ahead. There was a variety of speakers from all over the state who stood in front of the hundreds to speak their truth. The speakers ranged from faith leaders, community leaders and organizational representatives who shared stories, either their own or of the communities they work with. They spoke about the importance of building and maintaining a united front on the issues that affect all of us, especially considering the targeted threats under the Trump administration.

During our time at the state’s capitol, we had the opportunity to get to know, learn from and interview Said Abiyow, current President and CEO of the Somali Bantu Association of America, now a member organization of SDIRC. Below are his responses and impressions as a first time participant in Immigrant Day.

Immigrant Day: Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future

By Erin Tsurumoto Grassi

As the granddaughter of Japanese Americans who were imprisoned during World War II, the importance of Immigrant Day could not be clearer. After all, this is a chance for advocates like myself and others across the state to join efforts and advocate for immigrant rights in Sacramento.

The 21st Annual Immigrant Day will take place on Monday, May 15, and the  San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium is proud to be sending a record-size delegation to our state’s capital. Close to 40 leaders from across San Diego County will join hundreds of other community members and activists who will meet with elected representatives from every quarter of the county.

Record-Size Delegation Travels to Sacramento for Immigrant Day

Dozens of community members and advocates from San Diego will meet with the county’s state elected officials

SAN DIEGO, CA –The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC) is proud to send a record-size delegation to our state’s capital on Monday, May 15, for the 21st Annual Immigrant Day, a day of action that brings together advocates from across the state to fight for immigrant rights.

Close to 40 leaders from across San Diego County will join hundreds of other community members and activists. They will meet with elected representatives from every quarter of the county to advocate for policies that protect immigrant communities from a Federal administration that seeks to criminalize, deport and separate families.

SDIRC Statement on State Senate Voting to Advance the ‘California Values Act’

SAN DIEGO, CA – Today, the California State Senate voted to approve Senate Bill 54, also known as the “California Values Act.” This bill will help keep communities safe for everyone by ensuring that local and state resources do not go towards deportations. This will help make certain that local and state law enforcement are able to focus on protecting communities, not enforcing immigration law.  

The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium Advisory Board issued the following statement:

“The San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium applauds the State Senate for passing Senate Bill 54, the “California Values Act.” We are grateful to our local delegation, including State Sen. Toni Atkins, who is a co-author on the bill, for standing with immigrant communities. The “California Values Act” is critical to protecting immigrant families in our region and beyond, and we hope that the Assembly will now recognize the importance and urgent need for this bill and act accordingly to move it forward.”

 

State-by-State Estimates of the Family Members of Unauthorized Immigrants

By Silva Mathema

A new analysis from the University of Southern California’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration and the Center for American Progress estimates that millions of people, including American citizens, live in mixed-status families with unauthorized immigrants. Given this make-up, large swaths of people will suffer from any actions that target unauthorized immigrants.

Nationally, more than 16.7 million people have at least one unauthorized family member living with them, among whom nearly 50 percent, or 8.2 million, are U.S.-born or naturalized citizens. In fact, there are 5.9 million citizen children who will potentially be at risk if their unauthorized family members are targeted.

Read the full story here.