Mother Jones: 3 Ways Obama’s Immigration Executive Action Changes Everything (and One Way It Doesn’t)

The details of President Barack Obama’s much-rumored, much-debated executive action on immigration have been leaked to the press, and the broad outline, according to Fox News and the New York Times, includes deportation relief for upwards of 5 million people.

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ThinkProgress: The Most Heartbreaking Place In America Is Called ‘Friendship Park’

This is the first in a series of pieces from ThinkProgress chronicling the struggles of immigrant life in Southern California along the U.S.-Mexico border.

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA — When former First Lady Pat Nixon traveled to the U.S.-Mexico border in 1971 to inaugurate what is now Friendship Park just south of San Diego, California, she observed the then-thin string of barbed wire separating the two countries and reportedly said, “I hate to see a fence anywhere.” The implication, people thought, was that neither nation would ever build one.

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CREDIT: JACK JENKINS

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New York Post: How immigration can save Medicare

Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

 

Like 50 million other Medicare recipients, I will receive the care I need more or less free of charge thanks to Medicare.
It’s something most seniors take for granted — a benefit we believe we’re entitled to because, after all, we paid Medicare taxes all our working lives.

But as it happens, those taxes aren’t nearly enough to pay for the benefits we receive from the system — at least for most of us.

Despite the fact that I still work and pay hefty Medicare taxes, I am likely to become one of those people who becomes a drain on the system if I live long enough (my mother died at 90, my grandmother at 95).

Medicare is fast becoming unsustainable, especially as baby boomers like me enter the system.

We may be living longer and healthier lives, but it’s costing taxpayers more than we can afford unless something changes.

Debate in Washington has centered on fixes that are likely to be painful: lower benefits and restrict procedures; raise the age of eligibility; or substantially increase taxes to pay for the system.

But a new idea emerged this week from a study that shows that one demographic group in our population actually takes less out than they contribute: immigrants.

Allow more people to immigrate here, and we keep Medicare solvent longer.

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The Real Death Valley: The Untold Story of Mass Graves and Migrant Deaths in South Texas

The Real Death Valley: The Untold Story of Mass Graves and Migrant Deaths in South Texas from Weather Films on Vimeo.

Video: Graphic Warning

A Weather Channel Original Documentary

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Immigrant Rights Leaders Urge San Diegans to Respond with Values to Humanitarian Crisis

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We are not only facing a humanitarian crisis,
but a crisis of values as well – SDIRC

 

San Diego, CA: The leadership of the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC), a coalition of nearly 20 community, faith, labor, and legal organizations released the following statement in response to the current humanitarian crisis migrant families are facing in Southern California.

 

Alor Calderon, Chair of the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium and Program Director at the Employee Rights Center:

 

The issue of unaccompanied minors fleeing their home countries is a humanitarian crisis, not an immigration crisis, and should be treated as such.
Furthermore, we are not only facing a humanitarian crisis but a crisis of values as well.
We need a surge of values when dealing with a situation such as what we are witnessing.  We must respond to a real crisis with understanding and compassion to act in the best interests of the children who would face unimaginable violence should they be returned to the origin of the crisis.
We call on the good people of San Diego to raise their voices for reason and not let the minority of hateful voices skew this issue. The children need you. Now is not the time to be silent.
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