AP Exclusive: California Immigration Holds Drop

By ELLIOT SPAGAT and AMY TAXIN Associated Press

Far fewer immigrants arrested by California law enforcement are being turned over to federal authorities for deportation since a new state law went into effect in January.

The law was pushed by immigrant advocates and directs law enforcement agencies to more quickly release those without serious criminal records rather than hold them so federal officials can take them into custody for deportation proceedings.

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Protesters want Obama to end mass deportations

By: Yolanda Perdomo

More than 200 people, including groups of children, are staging a two-day march drawing attention to mass deportations of undocumented immigrants. The protesters want the Obama administration to end the practice by executive order.

The march, which began this morning at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in downtown Chicago before heading west. It is an extension of this past weekend’s National Day of Action against deportations.

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Talking About the Border with Opportunity Agenda

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LA Times: Border Patrol’s use of deadly force criticized in report

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An independent review of U.S. Border Patrol shootings criticizes the agency for ‘lack of diligence’ in its investigations and suggests that agents’ tactics sometimes create a pretext to open fire.

By Brian Bennett

February 27, 2014

WASHINGTON — Border Patrol agents have deliberately stepped in the path of cars apparently to justify shooting at the drivers and have fired in frustration at people throwing rocks from the Mexican side of the border, according to an independent review of 67 cases that resulted in 19 deaths.

The report by law enforcement experts criticized the Border Patrol for “lack of diligence” in investigating U.S. agents who had fired their weapons. It also said it was unclear whether the agency “consistently and thoroughly reviews” use-of-deadly-force incidents.

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This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

In a quiet finesse, supervisors reverse immigration stance

By Logan Jenkins

Last week, the Board of Supervisors slipped one past border warriors on both sides.

What could have been a riot turned out to be a 3-2 vote that generated barely a burp in the body politic.

Here’s how the defusing finesse worked:

For years, Chairman Greg Cox has wanted to rescind a 20-year-old county policy supporting a constitutional amendment denying U.S. citizenship to babies born to parents in this country illegally.

Three years ago, Cox tried to convince the board to support the reverse. No dice. He and Ron Roberts couldn’t get a third vote.

Before we go on, let’s step back 20 years.

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