New York Post: How immigration can save Medicare

Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

 

Like 50 million other Medicare recipients, I will receive the care I need more or less free of charge thanks to Medicare.
It’s something most seniors take for granted — a benefit we believe we’re entitled to because, after all, we paid Medicare taxes all our working lives.

But as it happens, those taxes aren’t nearly enough to pay for the benefits we receive from the system — at least for most of us.

Despite the fact that I still work and pay hefty Medicare taxes, I am likely to become one of those people who becomes a drain on the system if I live long enough (my mother died at 90, my grandmother at 95).

Medicare is fast becoming unsustainable, especially as baby boomers like me enter the system.

We may be living longer and healthier lives, but it’s costing taxpayers more than we can afford unless something changes.

Debate in Washington has centered on fixes that are likely to be painful: lower benefits and restrict procedures; raise the age of eligibility; or substantially increase taxes to pay for the system.

But a new idea emerged this week from a study that shows that one demographic group in our population actually takes less out than they contribute: immigrants.

Allow more people to immigrate here, and we keep Medicare solvent longer.

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The Real Death Valley: The Untold Story of Mass Graves and Migrant Deaths in South Texas

The Real Death Valley: The Untold Story of Mass Graves and Migrant Deaths in South Texas from Weather Films on Vimeo.

Video: Graphic Warning

A Weather Channel Original Documentary

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This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

Immigrant Rights Leaders Urge San Diegans to Respond with Values to Humanitarian Crisis

sdirclogo

We are not only facing a humanitarian crisis,
but a crisis of values as well – SDIRC

 

San Diego, CA: The leadership of the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium (SDIRC), a coalition of nearly 20 community, faith, labor, and legal organizations released the following statement in response to the current humanitarian crisis migrant families are facing in Southern California.

 

Alor Calderon, Chair of the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium and Program Director at the Employee Rights Center:

 

The issue of unaccompanied minors fleeing their home countries is a humanitarian crisis, not an immigration crisis, and should be treated as such.
Furthermore, we are not only facing a humanitarian crisis but a crisis of values as well.
We need a surge of values when dealing with a situation such as what we are witnessing.  We must respond to a real crisis with understanding and compassion to act in the best interests of the children who would face unimaginable violence should they be returned to the origin of the crisis.
We call on the good people of San Diego to raise their voices for reason and not let the minority of hateful voices skew this issue. The children need you. Now is not the time to be silent.
Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

DACA Renewal for DREAMers

If you received your work permit two years ago, then you will need to renew it now or in the coming months.
USCIS recommends to submit paperwork to renew your DACA status 4-5 months before it expires; but, do not worry if your permit is soon to expire.  You still have time and help is available.
If you need assistance to renew your DACA status call us at 619-800-1397 or send an email to itzel@alliancesd.org
Somethings about the renewal that you should know:
  • The cost remains the same for renewals and new applicants, $465.
  • You do not have to send information/documents that were filed in your first application: i.e. school records.
  • The renewal process is fairly simple and many are choosing to do it on their own, but if you have an questions about the process or if you have been in trouble with the law or immigration since receiving your DACA status, we strongly suggest that you see the assistance of a trusted private attorney or legal service agency… we can help you with this!
Stay updated through our website.
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This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

AP Exclusive: California Immigration Holds Drop

By ELLIOT SPAGAT and AMY TAXIN Associated Press

Far fewer immigrants arrested by California law enforcement are being turned over to federal authorities for deportation since a new state law went into effect in January.

The law was pushed by immigrant advocates and directs law enforcement agencies to more quickly release those without serious criminal records rather than hold them so federal officials can take them into custody for deportation proceedings.

Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.