Border Region

‘This Is My Home But My Voice Doesn’t Matter’

Posted by on Nov 8, 2016

By Gabriel Ellison-Scowcroft In San Diego, they’re all around us. Refugees who’ve become legal residents. Immigrants who were brought here illegally as children. People who’ve...

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Immigration Reform

Immigrant and Refugee Groups To Host Presidential Debate Watch Party

Posted by on Oct 18, 2016

Informal discussion with community members to follow afterward SAN DIEGO, CA  –  With immigration and refugees as one of the main topics of the third and final presidential...

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Citizenship

Union-Tribune: Military service leads to U.S. citizenship

Posted by on Apr 22, 2016

By Tatiana Sanchez Daniel Torres, an unauthorized immigrant who enlisted in the Marine Corps using a false birth certificate, became an American citizen on Thursday. He is likely...

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Deferred Action

Opinion: DACA Can Spell Hope for Many Undocumented Immigrants

Posted by on Oct 26, 2016

By Leonard Novarro For most, leaving the house is as normal as putting on a pair of shoes. But for Ruben Espino of San Diego, stepping into the world outside his home was a...

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Recent Posts

California’s university leaders are urging Trump to embrace students who are in the U.S. illegally

Leaders of California’s three systems of public higher education sent a joint letter to President-elect Donald Trump on Tuesday urging him to allow students who are in the country illegally to continue their educations without fear of deportation.

“These sons and daughters of undocumented immigrants are as American as any other child across the nation” in all but the letter of the law, do not pose a safety threat and have contributed to their communities, wrote University of California President Janet Napolitano, Cal State Chancellor Timothy P. White and Eloy Ortiz Oakley, chancellor-designate of California Community Colleges.

Read the full story here.

‘This Is My Home But My Voice Doesn’t Matter’

By 

In San Diego, they’re all around us.

Refugees who’ve become legal residents. Immigrants who were brought here illegally as children. People who’ve served time in prison and are out on parole. Regular old high school students.

They all share something that unites them: They can’t vote.

We spoke to several San Diegans who cannot legally vote in Tuesday’s election about how they grapple with paying taxes and investing in their community without having a say in how their city and country are run.

Read the full story here.

 

Opinion: DACA Can Spell Hope for Many Undocumented Immigrants

By Leonard Novarro

For most, leaving the house is as normal as putting on a pair of shoes. But for Ruben Espino of San Diego, stepping into the world outside his home was a stumbling block that might never end.

“I could not go out of the house without fear” of being stopped, arrested or deported, said Espino during a roundtable discussion in San Diego last week focusing on how many undocumented immigrants can recapture control of their lives. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, in short, DACA, an executive action by President Obama in 2012, allows many immigrants trying to pass under the radar to realistically navigate a path toward American citizenship — or, at the very least, thwart deportation. While the program doesn’t put immigrants on that path directly, it at least can get them started in the right direction.

Read the full story here.