Border Region

Federal judge orders more photos unsealed in suit alleging overcrowding in migrant detention centers

Posted by on Aug 8, 2016

A U.S. District Court judge in Tucson has released photographs and documents that immigration activists allege will show crowding and unsanitary conditions at detention centers...

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Immigration Reform

Black Lives Matter joins the fight against the unjust immigration system

Posted by on Aug 4, 2016

The Black Lives Matter movement this week announced it has adopted a 10-point platform that includes a call to end all deportations. It could be a game changer. Black Lives Matter,...

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Citizenship

Union-Tribune: Military service leads to U.S. citizenship

Posted by on Apr 22, 2016

By Tatiana Sanchez Daniel Torres, an unauthorized immigrant who enlisted in the Marine Corps using a false birth certificate, became an American citizen on Thursday. He is likely...

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Deferred Action

DACA Now: Returning To Mexico For The First Time In 17 Years

Posted by on Aug 16, 2016

By Juan Ramirez On June 2012, President Barack Obama signed into policy the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals also known as DACA. The policy provides a work permit and...

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Recent Posts

DACA Now: Returning To Mexico For The First Time In 17 Years

By Juan Ramirez

On June 2012, President Barack Obama signed into policy the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals also known as DACA. The policy provides a work permit and exemption from deportation that is renewable every two years to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. under the age of 16.

Former OPB news intern Juan Ramirez obtained a deportation deferral and was able to apply for “advance parole” — a permit that lets non-legal residents be paroled back into the U.S. — so he could travel to visit his sick father. Ramirez returned to Mexico this past fall for the first time in almost two decades.

Read his story.

Obama’s Last Attempt at Immigration Reform

Republicans Split On Defunding Obama Immigration Order

Immigration reform was supposed to be part of Obama’s legacy. His executive actions on immigration aimed to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation, but were eventually blocked by the U.S. Supreme Court. With a Republican-controlled Congress, legislation appears out of reach. So the administration is taking a new approach by expanding its assistance to Central American migrants, seeming to acknowledge years of frustration and failed attempts at reforming America’s immigration policy.

In January, Secretary of State John Kerry announced a plan, in conjunction with the United Nations, to identify people from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala who are eligible for refugee status. “We can both maintain the highest security standards and live up to our best traditions as Americans by welcoming those in need of help to our great country,” Kerry said in a speech at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.

What It’s Like To Be College-Bound And Worried About Your Immigration Status

Chelsea Beck/NPR

Chelsea Beck/NPR

Mayte Lara Ibarra and Larissa Martinez had just finished their senior year of high school when they each decided to go public with their immigration status. Both Texas students came to the U.S. illegally, and they didn’t want to keep that fact a secret any longer.

Ibarra identified herself on Twitter as one of the 65,000 undocumented youth who graduate high school in the U.S. Martinez revealed her status in the commencement speech she delivered at graduation.