Lawmakers Lay Groundwork For Obama To Take Big Steps On Immigration

Posted by on Aug 13, 2014

WASHINGTON — As the Obama administration gets ready to unveil a potentially wide-ranging new...

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Critics Say Executive Action on Immigration Would Be Unprecedented. They Forget Their History.

Posted by on Oct 3, 2014

Presidents have almost always acted first to permit immigration or prevent deportation—with...

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Free upcoming Naturalization Event

Posted by on May 13, 2014

Receive FREE legal assistance Don’t wait any longer, apply for citizenship!...

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KNOW YOUR RIGHTS! Immigrant Information Workshop Series

Posted by on Oct 14, 2014

JOIN US TODAY to find out if you qualify for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and...

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Recent News

Renovacion de DACA para DREAMers

El Dreamer Assistance Network continua promoviendo DACA con asistencia gratuita para aplicar. Los invitamos a que vengan a nuestros eventos gratuitos o que nos contacten para aprender mas sobre DACA y nuestros servicios gratuitos.

Renovacion de DACA para DREAMers

Si recibio su permiso hace dos años va a tener que renovar ahora o en los proximos meses.
USCIS recomienda renovar entre 4 – 5 meses antes de que el permiso expire; no se preocupe si el permiso se expira pronto, tenemos ayuda disponible.
Si necesita asistencia para renovar su DACA, llamenos o mande un texto al 619-800-1397 o mande un correo electronico a itzel@alliancesd.org.
Cosas que debe saber sobre la renovacion:
  • El costo es el mismo para renovaciones y primeras aplicaciones, $465
  • No tiene que mandar informacion/ documentos que mando en su primera aplicacion, como documentos escolares
  • El proceso de renovacion es simple y muchas personas estan eligiendo hacerlo solos, pero si tiene alguna pregunta sobre el proceso o a tenido problemas con la ley o inmigracion desde que recibio su DACA, sugerimos que busque la asistencia de un abogado de inmigracion de confianza o una agencia legal.

Mantengase informado en nuestro sitio.

 

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This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS! Immigrant Information Workshop Series

JOIN US TODAY to find out if you qualify for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and what the steps are to renew your DACA!

Learn about immigrant rights, protections provided by new laws in CA, and the impacts on you and your community!

Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Jacobs Center
2nd Floor, Emerald Hills Room
404 Euclid Ave., San Diego, Ca 92114
6:30 – 8:00 P.M.

 

Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

Critics Say Executive Action on Immigration Would Be Unprecedented. They Forget Their History.

Presidents have almost always acted first to permit immigration or prevent deportation—with Congress ratifying those actions later on.

PrezObama

President Obama speaks about immigration reform in the East Room of the White House, Oct. 24, 2013. At the time, the president renewed his call for Congress to pass sweeping immigration reform.(Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Image)

By Charles Kamasaki

The president’s announcement that he would soon take executive action to “to do what he could” to fix a broken immigration system in the absence of legislation has prompted critics to assert that this would be unprecedented unless first authorized by Congress. In fact, the record demonstrates the opposite. For at least the last 70 years, presidents have routinely acted first to permit the entry of people outside normal channels or to protect large numbers of people from deportation, with legislation ratifying the executive action coming later.

During World War II, the Roosevelt administration negotiated a temporary worker arrangement with the Mexican government, later known as the Bracero program, an action Congress ratified a year later. When the authorization expired in 1947, the Truman administration continued the program until it was reauthorized in 1951. Before it ended in 1964, millions of workers entered the United States under the auspices of the Bracero program, hundreds of thousands under executive—not legislative—authority. The program was rightly criticized for numerous labor and human-rights violations, but few questioned the executive authority it operated under.

After the war ended, President Truman used his executive authority to permit 250,000 people from Europe to enter or stay in the U.S. outside normal immigration channels. It was only three years after this exercise of discretion that Congress passed the Displaced Persons Act, permitting some 400,000 additional entries.

Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.