Democrats Lay Groundwork For Obama To Take Big Steps On Immigration

Posted by on Aug 13, 2014

WASHINGTON — As the Obama administration gets ready to unveil a potentially wide-ranging new...

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Amid border crisis debate, many new immigrants land in D.C. area

Posted by on Aug 4, 2014

By Richard Simon Virginia is more than 1,500 miles from the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas,...

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Want to know if you are eligible to become a U.S Citizen?

Posted by on May 13, 2014

The San Diego Naturalization Collaborative will be screening for citizenship and giving...

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Happy Birthday DACA: Youths Say It Improved Immigrants’ Lives

Posted by on Aug 18, 2014

By Suzanne Gamboa Young immigrants who two years ago lived with the possibility they could be...

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Recent News

Democrats Lay Groundwork For Obama To Take Big Steps On Immigration

President Obama Gives Statement Before Departing White House For Martha's Vineyard Vacation

WASHINGTON — As the Obama administration gets ready to unveil a potentially wide-ranging new policy on deportation relief, Democrats are making the case that there is political cover and precedent for him to go big.

In a newly released memo, the Democratic opposition research firm American Bridge highlights 10 instances in which past presidents have used their authority to apply selective prosecution of immigration laws. More often than not, those instances targeted specific populations caught up in complex and dangerous foreign policy crises. But immigration lawyers sympathetic to the White House say that these actions still provide sound principle on which the current administration can act.

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Tucson police pressured to end immigration calls

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By Astrid Galvan – Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Norlan Flores Prado was still wearing a hospital bracelet from his daughter’s birth when U.S. Border Patrol agents who had been called by Tucson police arrested him on Sunday afternoon.

Flores Prado was on his way to see his newborn when a Tucson police officer pulled him over for a traffic infraction. The officer asked him his immigration status after Flores Prado admitted he didn’t have a driver’s license, Tucson police say. He then admitted to being in the country illegally. Tucson police called the Border Patrol, who arrived within less than an hour.

Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

New York Post: How immigration can save Medicare

Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

 

Like 50 million other Medicare recipients, I will receive the care I need more or less free of charge thanks to Medicare.
It’s something most seniors take for granted — a benefit we believe we’re entitled to because, after all, we paid Medicare taxes all our working lives.

But as it happens, those taxes aren’t nearly enough to pay for the benefits we receive from the system — at least for most of us.

Despite the fact that I still work and pay hefty Medicare taxes, I am likely to become one of those people who becomes a drain on the system if I live long enough (my mother died at 90, my grandmother at 95).

Medicare is fast becoming unsustainable, especially as baby boomers like me enter the system.

We may be living longer and healthier lives, but it’s costing taxpayers more than we can afford unless something changes.

Debate in Washington has centered on fixes that are likely to be painful: lower benefits and restrict procedures; raise the age of eligibility; or substantially increase taxes to pay for the system.

But a new idea emerged this week from a study that shows that one demographic group in our population actually takes less out than they contribute: immigrants.

Allow more people to immigrate here, and we keep Medicare solvent longer.

Fair Use Notice
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which is not always specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of political, human rights, economic, social justice, and democracy issues. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.